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trained-band:start [16/02/2015 20:01]
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trained-band:start [27/09/2017 23:12] (current)
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 In some cases it is easy to distinguish Trained Band from '​Volunteer'​ units; Alexander Popham paraded the Bath Trained Band in early 1643 and ordered them to lay down their arms, subsequently recruiting a '​Volunteer'​ regiment on his own terms. In other cases the distinction is not so clear, so some '​Volunteer'​ regiments may appear here and some Trained Bands may appear in the Royalist or Parliamentarian lists. In some cases it is easy to distinguish Trained Band from '​Volunteer'​ units; Alexander Popham paraded the Bath Trained Band in early 1643 and ordered them to lay down their arms, subsequently recruiting a '​Volunteer'​ regiment on his own terms. In other cases the distinction is not so clear, so some '​Volunteer'​ regiments may appear here and some Trained Bands may appear in the Royalist or Parliamentarian lists.
  
-The Trained Bands of horse, also known as Freehold Bands, have left relatively little evidence, most likely dissolving as men volunteered for the Royalist or Parliamentarian horse regiments. ​+As well as the Trained Bands there were Freehold Bands in several countiesthese appear to have been the remainder of the armed citizenry that were not obliged to muster for training. The entire adult male strength of a county could theoretically be called out as the Posse Comitatus as was occasionally attempted, generally unsuccessfully. 
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 +Trained Bands of horse have left relatively little evidence, most likely dissolving as men volunteered for the Royalist or Parliamentarian horse regiments.  
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 +After the Parliamentarian victory in the First Civil War the Trained Bands of foot and horse continued, but were now more often called the Militia. During the Third Civil War the Militias were activated across England and Wales, with some fighting at the Battle of Worcester.
  
-After the Parliamentarian victory in the First Civil War the Trained Bands continued, but were now more often called the Militia. During the Third Civil War the Militias were activated across England and Wales, with some fighting at the Battle of Worcester. 
 The Militia continued in existence after the Restoration up until Victorian times, when they were incorporated into the County Regiments of the Army. The Militia continued in existence after the Restoration up until Victorian times, when they were incorporated into the County Regiments of the Army.