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royalist:horse-regiments:dutton-fleetwood [27/04/2017 21:59]
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royalist:horse-regiments:dutton-fleetwood [03/02/2020 14:56] (current)
1642
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 ====Sir William Campion==== ====Sir William Campion====
 [[https://​en.wikipedia.org/​wiki/​Thomas_Strickland_(cavalier)|Campion]] fought at Colchester in 1648, where he was killed. ​ [[https://​en.wikipedia.org/​wiki/​Thomas_Strickland_(cavalier)|Campion]] fought at Colchester in 1648, where he was killed. ​
 +
 +Sir William Campions regiment of Horse
 +
 +
 +
 +Lieutenant Colonel ​        Sir George Aglionby
 +
 +Sargeant Major               ​George Aglionby
 +
 +Captain ​                            ​George Kingsley ​ (1) + (2)
 +Captain ​                            Peter Darrell ​         I.O. Bucks. ​ CAMPION
 +Captain ​                            ​Thomas Knowles I.O. L + W CAMPION
 +Captain ​                            Duke Wyvell ​
 +Cornet ​                              ​Thomas Mildmay I.O. Oxfords. CAMPION
 +
 +Colonel Dutton Fleetwood
 +
 +Lieutenant Colonel ​    ​William Campion
 +
 +Captain ​                         Henry Batt              I.O. Bedfords. UNDER FLEETWOOD
 +Lieutenant ​                    ​Samuel Colling ​    I.O. Yorks. to Capt. Batt UNDER FLEETWOOD ​
 +
 +
 +(1) SP23.191.132
 +Petition of George Kingsley of Canterbury,​Kent.In Boarstall House.
 +DANNY ARCHIVES SUSSEX.
 +
 +(2) E.25.6
 +Mentions Captain George Kingsley in Boarstall House
 +
 +These below are letters from the Danny Archive in Sussex.I have a folder of them somewhere which I'd ordered direct from the archive. One of the documents has around 30 signatures of the Officers of the Garrison and I'm still trying to read them all. 
 +
 +
 +from Lipscomb Vol. 1 History of Buckinghamshire
 +
 +SIEGE OF BOARSTALL HOUSE. ​
 +
 +
 +
 +This mansion was rendered remarkable by having been converted into a garrison for King 
 +Charles the First in the civil wars : the command being entrusted to the gallant Sir William ​
 +Campion, Knt. by the following commission : 
 +
 +" Oxon, 28 October 1644-. ​
 +
 +" It is ordered, and Lieutenant Col. Campion is hereby authorised to take upon him the command of all the horse 
 +and foot belonging to the garrison at Borstall, as also to command as Governor in that garrison : and all the officers and 
 +soldiers there, are hereby required to observe and obey such orders and directions as they shall from time to time receive from him. 
 +
 +
 +
 +Ed. Littleton, C. S. 
 +Hen. Dovor. ​
 +F. Seymour. ​
 +Jo. Banks.
 +Hertford. ​
 +Sussex. ​
 +Chr. Hatton. ​
 +Edw. Hyde.
 +Dorset. ​
 +Chichester. ​
 +Edw. Nicholas." ​
 +
 +
 +
 +The King to Sir William Campion. ​
 +"​Charles R. Trusty and well beloved, We greet you well. Whereas the two brass pieces v/'^^ remain in that our 
 +garrison of Borstall will be very useful for some special service we have for them : and knowing no ready means where- ​
 +by our occasions may be supplied w* ye like, but by casting new, w^h for want of brass we cannot have done : our plea- 
 +sure and com'​and is, that you either send to Oxford by a good convoy these two brass pieces, or in lieu of them such a 
 +sufficient quantity of brass as may serve to make two new pieces of their size, and of one of these not to fail, as you re- 
 +spect ye good of our service. Given at our Court at Oxon, ye 29*^ of March IGii. By his Majtys command, ​
 +
 +Edw. Nicholas." ​
 +The King to Sir William Campion. ​
 +" Charles R. Whereas We find it necessary for ye better fortyfying of Borstall House, that ye church and other 
 +houses adjoining to ye same should be pulled downe. Our will and pleasure therefore is, and we doe hereby require and 
 +authorise you to take downe ye said church, and all such houses as you shall conceive may prove prejudicial! to ye secu- 
 +rity of that our garrison. And we do further give you full power and authority to cutt down such trees near ye said 
 +garrison as you shall find needful for ye making of pallisadoes and other necessaryes for ye use and defence of the same. 
 +For the doing whereof, this shall be your sufficient warrant. Given under our sign manual, at our Court at Oxford, this 
 +14tb of December le**. By his Majesty'​s command, Edw. Walker." ​
 +
 +" To our trusty and well beloved Sir Wm. Campion, Knight, ​
 +Governor of Borstall House." ​
 +
 +Prince Rupert to Sir William Campion, Governor of Borstall. ​
 +"These are, by virtue of my power, to authorise and command you, immediately upon sight hereof, to impress one 
 +cart out of every neighbouring parish near adjoining to your garrison of Borstall, and those so impressed, you are to 
 +employ for the space of thirty days towards the fortification of ye aforesaid garrison. Hereof you are in no wayes to 
 +fail, and for your so doing this shall be your sufficient warrant. Given at Oxford, under my hande and seale at armes, ​
 +this 13 of Feb. 1644. Rupert." ​
 +
 +" To Sir Wm. Campion, Knt. Governor of Borstall." ​
 +
 +Sir Edward Nicholas, Secretary of State, to Sir William Campion, Knt. 
 +
 +" 9 March 1644. 
 +" Sir, T have acquainted his Majesty with the letter I received this afternoon from you, which speaks the success your 
 +horse have had against the rebels, and am commanded to return his royal thanks, both for that good piece of service, ​
 +and your just and fair carriage in restoring those plundered teams to the proper owners, which were recovered from the 
 +rebels. This kind of treating your country will not only win reputation to yourself, but hearts to his Majesty and affec- ​
 +tion to his service ; and therefore he desires you will continue to protect and preserve them and theirs from the injury ​
 +and spoile of the rebels as far as you are able. For news, I shall refer you to the inclosed paper, which will furnish you 
 +with the freshest that is come to. Sir, your affectionate friend and humble servant, Edw. Nicholas." ​
 +
 +Copy of the Paper referred to. 
 +" The Earl of Essex his horse (to the number of about 1500) are still about JVicJcham—ihcy refuse to march till they 
 +are paid all their arrears (being many of them Walloons). The rebels doubt, if they pay them, they will then go over to 
 +the King, and therefore sent them word, that if they stood out, they would send a force to compel them to obey their 
 +orders : whereto answer is sent by the commander of Essex'​s horse, that, if the Londoners sent no greater force than 
 +they are, they would beat them, that if they sent a stronger, they would then retire to the King. Oxon, 9 Mar. 1644." ​
 +
 +The King to Sir William Campion. ​
 +" Charles R. Trusty and well beloved. We greet you well. Whereas we have dayly occasion to use great quantity ​
 +of tow, hemp, and flax, for ye making of match, and understanding that ye country wch lyes under command of your 
 +garrison, will yield considerable supplies of each kind, we do hereby require you forthwith to cause diligent inquiry to 
 +be made for all such hemp, flax, tow, and other materials fit for ye making of match, as lyes within your reach and 
 +power. And what you shall find remayne in ye custody of, or belonging either to well or ill affected persons, to seize 
 +and take to our use, and to send ye same by a safe convoy to this our city of Oxon : here to be delivered over at our 
 +match house to S""​ George Strode and Mr Wandesford, to whom we have committed ye care of ye manufacture,​ and who 
 +upon receipt thereof will give just and reasonable satisfaction for all proportions of tow, flax, or hemp, which shall be 
 +
 +
 +
 +78 ASHENDON HUNDRED. ​
 +
 +taken up from persons certified to be well aflFected to our service, and for bringing the same hitlier. The importance ​
 +hereof requires your speedy care and diligence: and these our letters shall be your sufficient warrant. (Jiven at our 
 +Court at Oxford this 12 of March 1644'. By his Majties command, Edw. Nicholas."​ ' ​
 +
 +Sir William Waller'​s summons to Sir William Campion, to surrender Boarstall House, is with- 
 +out date, but is expressed in these words : 
 +
 +" I demand a present surrender of Borstall House for the service of the King and Parliament; and if you please to 
 +send out some persons of quality, I shall be ready to entertain a parley. I desire a present answer. ​
 +
 +William Waller." ​
 +
 +It having been resolved to relinquish the possession of Boarstall, this was scarcely carried into 
 +effect, before it was discovered to have been a sad oversight : for the Parliamentary garrison at 
 +Aylesbury, having " felt the effects of their opponents possession of the place,"​ immediately put a 
 +garrison into Boarstall House, which as soon as the King's forces had left Oxford, and the armies ​
 +of Essex and Waller were withdrawn, gave little less trouble to that city than those troops; by ob- 
 +structing the passage of provisions, and by other annoyances, which occasioned complaints from 
 +the town and neighbourhood to the Lords of the Council ; and was made an excuse for their not 
 +complying with the commands that labourers should be employed to work upon the fortifica- ​
 +tions, &​c. ​
 +
 +When the removal of both armies to a distance from Oxford, had quieted the fears entertained ​
 +of a siege, the Lords considered of a remedy for this evil at Boarstall House ; and encouraged by 
 +Colonel Gage, who had undertaken the reduction of it, " they appointed a chosen party of infantry ​
 +left there by the King, with three pieces of cannon and a troop of horse of the town,^ who by 
 +the break of day, appeared before the place ; and with little resistance got possession of the 
 +church and outhouses, and then battered the house with cannon, which produced a parley, and the 
 +house was surrendered,​ with the ammunition, one piece of ordnance, and much good provision of 
 +victual, for horse and man ; the garrison having liberty to retire with their arms and horses : very 
 +easy conditions for so strong a post. This was obtained with the loss of one inferior officer, and 
 +two or three common men. Here Colonel Gage left a garrison, that did not only defend Oxford ​
 +from those mischievous incursions, but nearly supported itself by the contribution it drew from 
 +Buckinghamshire,​ besides the prey it frequently took from the neighbourhood of Aylesbury."​^ ​
 +
 +It is stated, on the authority of Sir Edward Walker, that when Boarstall House was attacked by 
 +Colonel Gage, Lady Dynhain, who resided there, " conscious of her disloyalty, stole away in 
 +disguise."​ ■* 
 +
 +In the next year (1645) some skirmishes happened at Boarstall and in the neighbourhood. ​
 +General Skippon is said to have designed the reduction of the place, and afterw ards Fairfax at- 
 +tacked it without success. ^ 
 +
 +Sill William Campion, Knt. to Prince Rupert. ​
 +" Sir, It pleased your Highness to confer upon me the command of Borstall House. Since your departure some have 
 +endeavoured to make it subordinate to the Governor of Oxon, insomuch that I was forced (in your Highness'​s absence) ​
 +to address myself to his Majesty. I pleaded if this was done that your commission would be slighted, so by conse- ​
 +quence your person, which I so much honour that I shall endeavour to serve with the last of my blood, and I know 
 +there is so much worth and justice in your Highness, that you will never suffer my reputation to be taken from me : 
 +
 +' For some account of Sir Edw. Nicholas, see Hitcham, and Pedigree of Nicholas. ​
 +' Oxford. 3 Clarendon'​s Hist, of the Rebellion, vol. ii. p. 494. 
 +
 +' Lysons'​s Magn. Brit. vol. i. p. 317. * Ibid. 
 +
 +
 +
 +BOARSTALL. 79 
 +
 +my command is altogether in another County, in the enemies quarters, my predecessor was never under the command ​
 +of any other Governor. I undertook the place upon the same terms, which your Highness confirmed unto mo; there- ​
 +fore, not doubting the continuance of your gracious favours I make bold to subscribe myself your Highness'​s most 
 +devoted and humble servant, Willi : Campion." ​
 +
 +" Borstall, April I5th 1645." ​
 +
 +The King to Sir William Campion, Knight, Governor of Borstall, or in his absence to his 
 +
 +Lt. Governor. ​
 +" Charles R. Our express pleasure and command is, that you give instant order for all ye horse and dragoons under 
 +your command to march with fitting officers unto Whately Bridge, and to be there precisely by three of ye clocke in ye 
 +afternoone, this present Sunday, there to receive further orders from our right trusty and right well beloved cosen, the 
 +Earle of Northampton : this you are to obey, and for your so doing, these shall be your sufficient warrant. Given at 
 +Oxford, this 20th of Aprill, nine in ye morning, 1645. By his Majties command. Edw. Walker." ​
 +
 +Lord Clarendon mentions, that soon after the taking of Leicester by the King's army (1 June 
 +1645), Fairfax attempted "to take a poor house near Borstall, and was beaten from thence with 
 +considerable loss, so that he drew off his men, very little to his honour."​ ' ​
 +
 +Sir Thomas Fairfax to Sir Will. Campion. ​
 +
 +"Sir, 3 June 1645. 
 +
 +" I send you this summons before I proceed to further extremities,​ to deliver up to me the house of Borstall, you now 
 +
 +hold, with all the ordnance, arms, and ammunition therein, for the use and service of the Kingdom, which, if you shall 
 +
 +agree unto, you may expect civility and fair'​respect,​ otherwise you may draw upon yourself those inconveniencies which 
 +
 +I desire maybe prevented. I expect your answer by this trumpet within one hour. 
 +
 +" Your Servt Tho. Fairfax." ​
 +
 +Sir William Campion to Sir Thomas Fairfax , in answer. ​
 +" Sir, You have sent unto me a summons of a surrender of this house for the service of the Kingdom : I thought that 
 +cant had been long ere this very stale (considering the King's often declarations and protestations to the contrary) now 
 +sufficient only to cozen women and poor ignorant people : for your civilities, so far as they are consonant to my honour, ​
 +I embrace : in this place, I absolutely apprehend them destructive not only to my honour, but also to my conscience. I 
 +am therefore ready to undergo all inconveniencies whatsoever, rather than submit to any, much less to those so disho- ​
 +nourable and unworthy propositions : this is the resolution of. Sir, yours, W. Campion." ​
 +
 +It seems that some proposals were made for the removal of Lady Campion from Boarstall, upon 
 +the prospect of a siege ; for on the same day Fairfax addressed the following letter, ​
 +
 +To Sir William Campion. ​
 +" Sir, It is much against my mind to be thought guilty in the least measure, of any act that hath but the colour of 
 +denial to a request that is so civil, and which to many may seem most reasonable ; but being at present so far engaged ​
 +in a design upon your house, which I hope speedily to effect, I cannot, without much prejudice to the encompassing ​
 +thereof, grant what you desire ; but if your Lady, or any other gentlewoman there, should fall into my power, I assure ​
 +you I shall take care that the like cruelty may never be used by any of this army, which hath lately been executed by 
 +some of yours at Leicester ; and shall remain your servant, Tho. Fairfax." ​
 +
 +" June 3d, 1645." ​
 +
 +The attack was made on the 6th of June, and Sir William Campion with gallantry repulsed the 
 +assailants, and killed many officers and soldiers. ^ 
 +
 +Fairfax is said to have retreated first to Brickhill and thence to Newport Pagnell, and Sherring- ​
 +ton: and the King received intelligence of his having "been beaten off, with loss, at Borstall,"​ as his 
 +Majesty marched through Harborough from Leicester. ^ 
 +
 +' Hist, of JRebellion, vol. ii. p. 655. ' Delafield'​s MSS. ' Echard'​s Hist. p. 615. 
 +
 +
 +
 +80 ASHENDON HUNDRED. ​
 +
 +The King's Council at Oxford to Sir Will. Campion, Knt, Governor of Borstall, ​
 +" Sir, Tlie rebels being very industrious to take all advantages, by surprise to seize any of his Majties garrisons ; and 
 +threatening every day to lay siege to such of ym as they have no hope otherwise to get possession of; it is held fit and 
 +necessary that each of his Majesties garrisons be provided and furnished compleatly for six months : and to ye end 
 +we may truly understand in what condition your garrison is, and for what time supply'​d wtli necessary provisions, we 
 +pray you forthwith to send us, by or before this day sennight, upon your reputation, a very true and exact certificate in 
 +writing, what number of horse and foote, and what proportion of ammunition there is in your garrison, that we may 
 +give an account thereof to his Majtii^, according to ye trust by him reposed in us. So we rest your very loving friends, ​
 +
 +Ed. Littleton, C. S. Cottington. ​
 +
 +Hertford. Dorchester. ​
 +
 +Hen. Dovor. Chr. Hatton. ​
 +
 +F. Seymour. ​
 +
 +" Oxon, this 7 July IGiS. Edw. Nicholas." ​
 +
 +To Sir Will. Campion, Knt. &​c. ​
 +" Sir, Whereas there is very great want of bell-metal for casting of ordnance for his Ma'ies service, and being in- 
 +formed that you have lately demolished a church by Boarstall, so as this want may be supply'​d by ye bells taken down 
 +in that church ; we pray you to send hither to Oxford by a safe convoy wth all possible expedic'​on,​ all y' said hells, ​
 +and cause ym to be deliver'​d to S""​ George Strode or Mr Wandesford at ye Schooles, to be employ'​d for making of ord- 
 +nance. And you are to assure ye parishioners of ye parish, that they shall receive satisfaction for these said bells, so 
 +soon as his JNIaties great occasions will permit ye same. So we bidd you farewell, and rest your loving friends, ​
 +
 +Cottington. Hertforde. ​
 +
 +Hen. Dovor. Ciiichester. F. Seymour. ​
 +" Oxford, this 26 of July IGiS. Edw. Nicholas." ​
 +
 +Herbert Morley to Sir Will. Campion, ​
 +
 +" 28 July 1645. 
 +" Sir, Old acquaintance needs no apology. All your Sussex friends [are] in health, and continue their wonted affections ​
 +towards you; equally valuing your welfare with their own. I could impart more, but letters are subject to miscarriage, ​
 +therefore I reserve myself to a more fit opportunity. If you please, in return hereof, to send me a character, I shall 
 +gladly send in cyphers that I am unwilling to delineate. If a conference might be had, I conceive it would be most for 
 +the satisfaction of us both. To prevent any possible hazard of your person, if you please to let your Lady meet me at 
 +Watford or Barkhamstead,​ or come hither, I will procure her a pass, and make it evidently appear that I am. 
 +
 +Your most affectionate servant, Herbert Morley." ​
 +
 +Sir William Campion to Herbert Morley. ​
 +" Sir, I am glad to hear of the welfare of my friends in Sussex. For any business you have to impart to me, I have 
 +that confidence in you, by reason of our former acquaintance,​ that I should not make any scruple to send my wife to the 
 +places mentioned, but the truth is, she is at present so near her time, that she is altogether unfit to take so long a jour- 
 +ney ; and I assure you that I have not any character that I can decypher without tedious expressions,​ and much trouble ​
 +to you, unless we were together, but if you please to send me one, I shall observe it : or otherwise, if j'ou will send hither ​
 +any servant or friend, in whom you can confide, I engage myself unto you on my reputation, that he shall have free 
 +liberty to return with my pass. If you have any thing of importance (as I doubt not but you have by your letter) I 
 +desire your answer with what convenient speed you can, for assure yourself, that there is none living that shall be more 
 +glad to find out a way to serve you than. Sir, your trusty friend and servant, ​
 +
 +" Borstall, August Ttli, leia. William Campion." ​
 +
 +Herbert Morley to Sir W. Campion. ​
 +" Sir, I hope I may love you without offence, although at Borstall, and presume so far upon our old friendship, as to 
 +assure myself you stand so much upon your reputation that you will use the bearer hereof kindly, being an honest man 
 +whom your friends have persuaded to be the messenger to convey their respects to you. I think it not safe to write any 
 +news. I shall therefore only desire you to send your Lady speedily amongst your friends here, not knowing how soon 
 +Oxford and your garrison may be blocked up. I desire you will burn my letter as soon as you have read it, least here- 
 +after it may fall into such hands as may question me for holding correspondency with you. In what I can serve you, 
 +assure yourself you may command, Your affectionate servant, ​
 +
 +" Aug. 4th, 1645. Herbert Morley." ​
 +
 +
 +
 +BOARSTALL. 81 
 +
 +Sir W. Campion'​s answer to Mr. Herbert Morley. ​
 +
 +" Sir, I thank you both for your kind letters, especially for the courtesy you proffer my wife. I should have willingly ​
 +made use of the proffer, but that she is absolutely incapable, being so near her time ; but, however, if it ever lie in my 
 +power (as I doubt not but it may) I shall study to deserve the favour. As for the business you intrusted by word of 
 +mouth, I could, if I would, have drawn you on to see what advantage I could make by it, but being my friend and old 
 +acquaintance,​ I scorn it, and do therefore set down my absolute answer : I did not rashly or unadvisedly put myself ​
 +upon this service, for it was daily in my prayers for two or three months together to God to direct me in the right way, 
 +and besides, I had conference with divers able and honest men for advice, who confirmed me in my judgment. When I 
 +came first to the King, he to my knowledge was in a far worse condition than now ; but I see and feel that God oweth a 
 +judgment to this land, and is now a paying of it for our sins : but / am as confident as I am alive, that the King, or his 
 +posterity, at length will be restored, which I am bound to assist to my power by my oath of allegiance; but rather than 
 +faile, I had rather die a beggar, than wittingly and willingly to violate my conscience towards my God and King. I 
 +believe you think not that I fight for Popery ; (God knows my heart) 1 abhor it. God prosper me no farther than my 
 +desires and endeavours tend to the preservation of the Protestant Religion, settled in Queen Eliz. days, the just pre- 
 +rogative of the King, and just privileges of Parliament : but, however, I heartily thank you for your desire of the pre- 
 +servation of me and mine, and if it ever lie in my power to do any courtesy for you, it shall not be wanting in 
 +
 +Your faithful friend and servant, William Campion." ​
 +
 +" Borstall, August 4th (or 9th,) IGIS. ' ​
 +
 +The condition of Boarstall is noticed by Symonds, one of the King's train, when his Majesty ​
 +passed through this place in his road from Wing to Oxford, on Thursday 28th August 1645 : 
 +
 +" This day we marched to Bostoll House, belonging to the Lady Denhara. ​
 +
 +" Sir William Campion is Governor : there is a pallazado, or rather a stockado, without the 
 +grafFe : a deep graffe and wide ; full of water : a pallizado above the false bray : another six or 
 +seven feet above that, near the top of the curten." ​
 +
 +The King to Sir William Campion, ​
 +" Charles R. 
 +" Trusty and well beloved, We greet you well. Whereas, upon the revocation of our Commission granted to our 
 +right dear nephew Prince Rupert, as General of our Forces, all powers derived by our Commission from him are void ; 
 +yet, in regard of your good and faithful service, we do not intend that j'ou should receive any prejudice thereby ; and 
 +therefore, we are graciously pleased, and do hereby confirm unto you any commission received, either from ourself, or 
 +our said dear nephew, willing you to proceed in the government and preservation of that place with your utmost care 
 +and endeavours, and therein to obey such orders as you may or shall receive from ourself, our dearest son the Prince, ​
 +or from our right dear son the Duke of York, and any three or more of the Lords and others, Commissioners at Oxford. ​
 +All which, we are well assured you will not faile to perform. And so we bid you farewell. From our Court at Bridge- ​
 +North, this first of October IGiS." ​
 +
 +" Charles R. Our pleasure likewise is, that you precisely obey and observe such settlements as our right dear son 
 +the Duke of York, and the Lords Commissioners at Oxford, shall make in matters of contributions. ​
 +
 +By his Majesties Command, Edw. Walker." ​
 +
 +" Governor of Borstall." ​
 +
 +Francis Martyn to Sir Wm. Campion. ​
 +" Sir, Upon your request, and the ingagement of your honour, I sent you six of your own men, in lieu of four of 
 +Major Shilborne'​s and two of Capt. Phipps, which are not yet returned: I wonder much at this kind of proceedings,​ for 
 +I ever conceived the word of a soldier was to be preserved inviolate as long as the person pretended to honour : where- ​
 +fore I shall desire those men may be sent me, otherwise I shall give notice to the Committee for Prisoners at London, ​
 +and other garrisons of ours, whereby exchanges maybe stopt until I have right done me, either by returning those six 
 +men again, or mine: and hereafter I shall be more careful of inlarging of any, being uncivilly used for my courtesy : but 
 +I shall dispense with it, until I have your answer, and subscribe myself, Sir, your servant, ​
 +
 +« Aylesbury, 2d October, 1645. Francis Martyn." ​
 +
 +' There is probably some error in the date of this letter. ​
 +VOL. I. M 
 +
 +
 +
 +82 ASHENDON HUNDRED. ​
 +
 +Sin WiLLiA.M Campion'​s keply. (Without date.) ​
 +" Sir, I much wonder that you are so forward, not only to suspect, but in a manner tax me of incivih'​ty and breach ​
 +of promise before you liad received my answer, which was sent tiiis morning. I desire you to conceive tliat I am sensi- ​
 +ble of the honour of a soldier, and wish no longer to live than to keep that inviolated : you cannot but be conscious ​
 +how I have been deceiv'​d formerly in my propositions of exchanges from your parts. But, howsoever, you shall find 
 +me so honest, and so far from dishonour, that if my letter I sent you this morning give not satisfaction (so that you will 
 +engage yourself upon your honour and reputation for the return of those that I sent) I shall send unto you those you 
 +sent me. But I would have you take notice, that I am very sensible of your hasty and harsh message, for you should ​
 +have had an answer long before, had I not been at O.Kon upon urgent occasions. Let this suffice, from him that is, 
 +
 +Sir, yours, Willi. Campion." ​
 +
 +The King to Sir Wm. Campion, Knt. Governor of Borstall House. ​
 +" Charles R. Trusty and well beloved, We greet you well. It is not unknown to any of you whose armes we use for 
 +yf maintenance of ye established lawes of this kingdom, both in Church and State, how great ye injustices are wth vve 
 +suffer therein, and in all other things wcli are ours, and particularly in our revenue, w'l is now so much in ye rebels'​ pos- 
 +session, that they have not left us any competent subsisting for ourself, our children, and family, the expence whereof ​
 +was in part supply'​d from ye several counties of this our kingdom, by ye composition,​ provisions of beefes, muttons, ​
 +wheat, &c. well were a great support to our housekeeping : but now, by reason of these unhappy troubles, cannot be 
 +collected in that orderly way they were wont to be. Wherefore we will and command you, that wtliin the precincts of 
 +your government, you levy nionthlj'​ for ye expence of our housekeeping,​ ye sum of thirty pounds, and that you make 
 +payment thereof to such person as shall be appointed for that service by ye Lord Steward of our Houshold, beginning ​
 +from ye first of December next, for that month following, and so successively at ye beginning of every month. And 
 +hereof we .... you should not faile, because when you looke upon your own proportions,​ you cannot but think it rea- 
 +sonable your King should subsist as well as his officers. Given at our Court at Oxford, ye IQi'i day of November 1645. 
 +
 +By his Majtys command, Edw. Nicholas." ​
 +
 +The King to Sir William Campion, &​c. ​
 +" Charles R. Trusty and well beloved, We greet you well. As we have just reason to be offended with such of the 
 +Governors of our garrisons who faile to send such horse, as, by our pleasure signified by the Governor of this place, they 
 +were required to send, to assist Sr John Causfieldin the design we commanded him : so we give you thanks for your 
 +ready obedience in sending the force required from )'ou by the like orders from him, which we pray you to comply with 
 +as you have begun ; it being our pleasure, signified by him, and in our absence, the commands of the Lords and others, ​
 +our Commissioners here. For thereby our service will be the better effected ; which we are confident you study to ad- 
 +vance to the utmost of your power : and so we bid you farewell. From our Court at Oxford, this Sd of December 16-15. ​
 +
 +By his Majesties command, Edw. Walker." ​
 +
 +To Sir Wm. Campion, our Governor of Borstall. ​
 +" Charles R. Trusty and well beloved. We greet you well. In this conjuncture of our affiiires, nothing imports us 
 +more than to provide for ye safety of our garrison at Oxford, to w'l purpose (for divers services appointed by us) we have 
 +issued several letters to partic persons for loans, of whose abilityes we are well satisfied : and amongst them we have 
 +sent you ye list enclosed, signed by ye clerks to ye Lords and Commons of Parliamt here in Oxford, and doe require you, 
 +as you will give a testimonye of your affection to our service and obedience to our commands, that you cause ye persons ​
 +named in this list to be sent unto Oxford, before, or at furthest upon, ye thirteenth of this instant December. And if they 
 +themselves be not resident upon their estates, that you send their Bailiff, or such other person as manages their estates, ​
 +before ye Lords and Commons here to undertake for them. We have great reasons to conceive fitt to enjoin this service ​
 +within the time allotted you. And therefore we require you to interprett this our letter as a service that we punctually ​
 +expect from you, and wli will abide no delay. And so we bid you fixrewell. (liven at our Court at Oxford, the fifth 
 +day of December, in ye one and twentieth year of our reign. By his Majtics command, ​
 +
 +Edw. Nicholas." ​
 +
 +In 1646 the fjarrison of Boarstall was again attacked by Fairfax, and the following letters passed ​
 +between the contending parties : 
 +
 +
 +
 +BOARSTALL. 83 
 +
 +For Sir William CAMPio>​f,​ Coll. Governour of Borstall. ​
 +" S"",​ I have sent back unto you, herein enclosed, the protection wh you sent unto our High Sherife'​s wife," and I 
 +desire you in exchange, to send backe unto mee by this bearer, my Drum, the protection wh I sent unto your Lady, 
 +wh I may not any longer continue : and, therefore, I doe hereby recall it. Instead thereof, I doe hereby grant her two 
 +dayes liberty from ye date hereof, to remove w* her goods into your garrison, and not to any other place : wch time 
 +being expired, I must be excused if any inconvenience follow by her not returninge thither. But during these two 
 +dayes, this letter shall bee a sure protection of her and her goods from violence or injury, by any under my command, ​
 +or that I can prevayle with. Sir, its not usual with me to retract a civility, wherefore resent it not as any incivility ​
 +from, Sr, your servant, Tho. Bulstrode." ​
 +
 +" Aylesbury, 4° Aprilis 1646. 
 +
 +" Let this bearer, my Drum passe to Borstall garrison undisturbed. Tho. Bulstrode." ​
 +
 +" Aylesbury, 40 Aprilis 1646." ​
 +
 +The King to Sir Will. Campion. ​
 +" Charles R. Trusty and well beloved, We greet you well. We have seen your letter, dated this day, to Secretary ​
 +Nicholas, who by our command hath examined the reports given out concerning you, which by him we understand to 
 +be very frivolous, and such as deserve our own and your scorn, rather than further inquisition ; yet we have appointed ​
 +him to make what more inquiry may be requisite, and to endeavour that satisfaction may be given you therein, by 
 +punishment on the persons who shall be found faulty in that slander. We assure you, no misreport shall take place 
 +with us to the lessening of the good opinion and full confidence which your many faithful services have fixed in us, of 
 +your loyalty and honest resolutions,​ which, whenever it shall please God to bring us out of these distresses, we shall re- 
 +member and recompence. In the mean time we desire you to use your utmost endeavours to defend the garrison we 
 +have entrusted to your charge, and not to part from it on any termes till you hear farther from us, or from our Com- 
 +missioners at Oxford, to whom from time to time fwhen we shall think fit to remove from hence) you are to make your 
 +addresses. Given at our Court at Oxford, the 7th day of April 1646. By his Majesties command, ​
 +
 +" Governor of Borstall."​ Edw. Nicholas." ​
 +
 +Sir Thomas Fairfax to Sir Wm. Campion. ​
 +" Sir, I doe by these summon you to deliver uppe Borstall House into my hands, for ye use of the Parliament : you 
 +may have honourable termes for yourself and all within your garrison, if you seasonably accept thereof. I desire your 
 +answer this day. T. Fairfax." ​
 +
 +" May xiith, 1646. 
 +" For Sr William Campion, Governor of Bostoll House." ​
 +
 +Sir William Campion'​s Answer. ​
 +" Sir, I have received this morning your summons for ye delivering up of this garrison. I desire to have ye favour ​
 +to send to his Majestic, from whom I received ye command, to know his will. If you think that will require too much 
 +time, that I may then send to ye King's Commissioners at Oxon, to knowe their resolutions,​ from whom I am to receive ​
 +orders in his Majesties absence. Since I sent to them last, I heare there is a messenger come to them from his Majestie, ​
 +who, I doubt not, hath brought orders for all ye garrisons adjacent. If you please to grant either of these requests, you 
 +shall oblidge, and receive a satisfactory answer, as far as may be with honour : If otherwise, I shall endeavour to my 
 +outmost to perfect ye trust his Majestie hath imposed upon mee, and remaine, Sir, your servant, ​
 +
 +" Borstoll, May ye 12, 1646. Will. Campion." ​
 +
 +Sir William Campion to King Charles. ​
 +" Sir, The enemie hath blocked us up almost 8 weekes. On ye 12th day of this month I received Sr Tho. Fairfax ​
 +his summons : I have had several parlees wth ye enemie, who have told me, I should have very good conditions, if I 
 +would surrender ye garrison, withal that your Majestie was in their handes, and I could have no hopes of reliefe. My 
 +answer to ye one and ye other was, that if your Majestie were in their power, it could be noe prejudice to them to 
 +suffer mee to send a messenger to know your Majesties pleasure and command ; that being refused, to sell ourselves as 
 +deare as we could. And though what they told mee were true, I would not part with my trust without orders. The 
 +bearer hereof, Capt. Pykes, (of whom I beseech your Majestie to take notice) hath been content to hazard himself to 
 +
 +' This protection does not appear to have been preserved. ​
 +
 +
 +
 +84 ASHENDON HUNDRED. ​
 +
 +fetch unto mee your Majesties will and pleasure. I shall not value my lyfe, fortune, or posteritie to serve your Majestic^ ​
 +and I thanke God, the gentlemen and others of this garrison are well resolved. As I doubt not of your Majestie'​s care 
 +of us, my resolution is to persist unto ye ende. Your Majestie'​s most faitliful, loyal, and humble subject, ​
 +
 +" May 26, 16i6. W. Campion." ​
 +
 +MaJOU SlIlLBORNE TO SiR WiLLIAM CaMPION. ​
 +
 +" Sir, I received your letters dated ye SOf" and SOt''​ ins*, and have acquainted ye Generall wt'i your desires therein, but 
 +cannot obtain leave for your sending to Oxford. The King for certain hath sent to Sr Tho. Gleraham to surrender up 
 +Oxford, and he hath sent to ye Generall for another treatye, and last night ye Generall sent in propositions to Oxford, ​
 +soe yt it is verily believed they will be agreed unto, and I could heartilye wish you would make noe more nicities of a 
 +businesse that you and ye gentlemen wt'i you are so much concerned in. I am confident you may yet have good con- 
 +ditions, and should bee very sorrye if you shall still denie them. It is conceived yt they will not stand long eare they 
 +conclude upon these p'​positions,​ and I assure you by the word of a souldier, it will then be too late for you to expect ​
 +such conditions as now you may have. And, indeed S^, I write this not onely so much for ye sparing of more blood, as 
 +for that I desire you would hold upon your present conditions. And if in any thing I may be serviceable to bring this 
 +to a speedy end, I shall think my endeavour well bestowed, and remain to be, Sr, your servant, ​
 +
 +" From the Leaguer, before Borstall House, May ;51, 1646. Tno. Shilborne." ​
 +
 +" It was late last night eare I returned from ye General, or else I should a sent before now." ​
 +
 +" My Lord Wharton was here yesterday, and he is much sett against you, because you are soe obstinate, and soe are 
 +divers others, there being no possibilities of anye reliefe. The Scots and ye Parliament are very well agreed, and Mon- 
 +trose disbanded, and those garrisons in Scotland to be delivered to the Parliament forces there. This I can assure you 
 +i»true. Tiio. Shilborxe." ​
 +
 +Endorsed : 
 +" For Sr William Campion, Governor of Borstall House, ​
 +present." ​
 +" Permitt this Trumpett to passe your scoutes and gardes to Borstall. Tho. Siiilborne." ​
 +
 +Sir William Campion'​s answer to Major Siiilborne. ​
 +
 +" Sir, I have receaved your letter, dated this 31st of May. You have therein express'​d a great deale of respect to 
 +me and ye rest of ye gentlemen in this garrison, for wh we shall alwayes give you the deserved testimonye of a faire and 
 +noble enymye. Two things I shall desire you to beleeve firmely of us : first. That we shall not stand upon indiscreet or 
 +vaine nicetys in a case of so much concernment : next, that we have no doubt, but that it is all true, whereof you give us 
 +information by your letter. But nothing beinge more pretious to us than our honor (weli now is all in effect that is left 
 +us) I am confident you will easily assent, that wee cannot be fairly discharg'​d that way, to receave our information in 
 +these points only from an enymye. If you will endeavour to obtaine nie this favor from your General, that I may have 
 +leave (since not to send a friend into Oxford) at least to send this letter inclosed to Sf Tho. Glemham, to let him knowe 
 +that I heare he is upon a treatye, upon his Majesties directions, and that your Generall'​s,​ drum, or trumpett, may carry 
 +ye letter and bring backe the answer, you shall doe me a very acceptable office, and, upon ye receipt of his answer, I 
 +shall soon strike up this business. It is nothing but what I conceive he may grant me, without either dishonor to himself ​
 +or disadvantage. And I shall receave it from him as a great civilitye. If I fayle in obteyning of it, yet I shall acknow- ​
 +ledge that you have endeavoured by faire wayes to oblige, S'r, your servant, ​
 +
 +" May 31st, 1616. Will. Campion." ​
 +
 +Sir Thomas Fairfax to Major Shilborne. ​
 +
 +" S'r, I should be as willing to doe any civilitye for S'"​ W"i Campion as any man ; but must not neglect ye duty of 
 +that trust I owe to yc Parliament: I doe wonder he should stand upon such nicetyes, as his desire to send a letter to ye 
 +Governor of Oxon about ye surrendering of ye garrison of Borstall ; I know it is not fitt for me to permitt such a thing, ​
 +though I doe believe he would easily be satisfyed, if he should send ; but for me to suffer such a thing, now I am upon 
 +treatye for Oxon, I hold it altogether inconvenient ; yet, to put him out of doubt, I pray you shew him this letter wh I 
 +received from S'"​ Thos. Glemham, and if he knowes his hand, I believe ye sight of that will satisfye him. I wonder men 
 +should think themselves ingaged in honor to defend places of soe little consequence to them they serve, especially con- 
 +sidering to what their affaires are reduced. Truly, if Oxford come in, as I make no question but it will, what can he 
 +expect by holding out longer, but an impossibilitye of ever making any termes for hiniselfe, cither to ye saving of his 
 +person or estate, and of those wtli him : you may show him Sr Thos. Glemham his letter to me, and if you find him not 
 +obstinate, I shall be willing at ye present to give him fitting termes. I have noe more to say at present, but rest 
 +
 +" Heddington, June 1st, 1616. Your very loving friend, Tho. Fairfax." ​
 +
 +
 +
 +BOARSTALL. ​
 +
 +
 +
 +85 
 +
 +
 +
 +Sir Thomas Glemham'​s Letter, referred to, in the preceding. ​
 +" Sir, I have received your letter of ye 30*1' of May, enclosing certayne articles on wh you desire the treatye may 
 +proceed : and thereupon it is here resolved that the treatye shall go on according to ye paper of ye 23 of May last, de- 
 +livered by your Commissioners,​ wth an assured confidence, that according to what was conteyned in your first summons, ​
 +and ye said paper of ye 23 of May last, the articles by treatye will be reduced to fittinge, just, and honorable conditions ​
 +on both sides. And for better expedition it is resolved, that although the number of ye Commissioners cannot be 
 +lessen'​d,​ yet ye Commission shall now be inlarg'​d to any seven of ye Commissioners to treate and conclude ; and soe 
 +soone as ye Commissioners shall be ready to goe to Marston (w^ will be speedily) I shall send to desire your safe con- 
 +duct for them. S""​ your humble servant, Tho. Glemham." ​
 +" Oxon, June 1st, 1646. 
 +
 +
 +
 +Council of War for treating for the Surrender of Borstall House. ​
 +" Borstall, June 2°, 164.6. ​
 +
 +" The Governor with the Councill of War this day holden, and ye rest of ye gentlemen of this garrison of Borstall, ​
 +having received satisfaction that ye garrison of Oxon is already upon treatye, doe likewise think it fitt that there be a 
 +treatye for this garrison of Borstall, and in testimony of their uniforme assent in that point, have hereunto subscribed ​
 +their hands : 
 +
 +
 +
 +Will. Campion. ​
 +P. Gamlyn. ​
 +Geo. Aglionbt. ​
 +Geo. Kingsley. ​
 +Tho. Bates. ​
 +Peter Dayrell. ​
 +Duke Wyvell. ​
 +Rich. Wyan. 
 +Humfrey Peake. ​
 +
 +
 +
 +Edward Campion. ​
 +
 +Edw. Master. ​
 +
 +Tho. Russell. ​
 +
 +Stephen Boughton. ​
 +
 +Jo. Mille. ​
 +John Trowte. ​
 +Thos. Graunte. ​
 +John Robinson. ​
 +Will. Thomson. ​
 +
 +
 +
 +Ben. Poole. ​
 +Anthony Foshard. ​
 +Thomas Aglionby. ​
 +James W^yan. ​
 +Thomas Mildmay. ​
 +William Sclater. ​
 +Paul Dayrell. ​
 +Tho. Weller. ​
 +John Martin. ​
 +John Farnaby." ​
 +
 +
 +
 +Sir Thos. Fairfax to Sir Wm. Campion, appointing Commissioners. ​
 +" S'r, I herein send you ye names of my Commissioners wh I have appointed and authorised to treate with you con- 
 +cernynge the rendition of Bostall. I have given power to Major Shilborne to nominate the time and place to meete at ; 
 +and likewise given him authority to give a safe conduct for your Commissioners to come to ye place appoynted. ​
 +
 +
 +
 +Water Eaton, June 3, 164-6. ​
 +The names of my Commissioners are these, or any three of them : 
 +
 +
 +
 +Y'r servant, ​
 +
 +
 +
 +T. Fairfax." ​
 +
 +
 +
 +Quarter Mr; General Gravenor. ​
 +Major Harrison. ​
 +Major Huntington. ​
 +Major Shilborne." ​
 +
 +
 +
 +Declaration signed by the Officers in Borstall House. ​
 +
 +" 6 June 1646. 
 +" All we whose names are underwritten,​ having seriously considered all intelligences and circumstances,​ do verily ​
 +believe the King is not in a condition to relieve us ; we do therefore hold it fitting that there be a treaty for the surren- ​
 +der of the garrison on honourable conditions, for which purpose we desire the Governor it may be done within conve- ​
 +nient time, for his and our security, and that we may not be disenabled for his Majesty'​s service hereafter, if occasion ​
 +shall serve : 
 +
 +Jo. Gamlyn. Tho. Bates. Rich. Wyan. 
 +
 +Geo. Aglionby. Peter Dayrell. James Harringe. ​
 +
 +George Kingsley Duke Wyvell. Humfrey Peake. ​
 +
 +John Trowte. Anthony Foshard. Stephen Boughton. ​
 +
 +Ed. Master. John Farnaby, Ben. Poole. ​
 +
 +Jo. Mille. James Wyan. Thomas Mildmay. ​
 +
 +Tho. Russell. Paul Dayrell. John Martin. ​
 +
 +John Robinson. William Sclater. Roger Suckiman. ​
 +
 +Thomas Aglionby. Tho. Weller. Edward Campion." ​
 +
 +
 +
 +86 ASHENDON HUNDRED. ​
 +
 +Surrender. ​
 +
 +" Articles of agreement made ye 6^^ of June, between Quarter Master General Gravenor, Major Harrison, Major 
 +Huntington, and Major Shilborne, on ye behalfe of his excellencye Sir Thomas Fairfax, on ye one part : and S^ George ​
 +Aglionby, Knight, Captn George Kingsby, Capt" Duke Wyvell, and Edwd Campion, Esqre, on ye behalf of Sr Wm 
 +Campion, Knt, Governor of Borstal!, on ye other part, as followeth : 
 +
 +" I. That ye garrison of Borstall, wtli all the ordynance, armes, ammunitions,​ and all other provisions and furniture of 
 +war w'​soever,​ belonging to ye said garrison, except wt is allowed in ye ensuing articles, be deliver'​d to his Excellencye ​
 +Sr Thomas Fairfax, or whom lie shall appoint to receave them for ye use of ye Parlmt upon the 10* of June next ensu- 
 +ing, and yt upon signing these articles, thereto be deliver'​d to ye Comms on his Excellency'​s part, a just bill of all yc 
 +stores, then remaining in ye said garrison, and ye same to be preserved wHiout spoil or imbessilmt, and deliver'​d up as 
 +aforesaid. ​
 +
 +" H. That ye Governor wtli his proper servants, and all officers in commission, and gent" within the said garrison, ​
 +shall march away wtli their own proper goods to their own houses, if they shall desire it, and shall have the General'​s ​
 +pass and protection to remain quietly at their habitations,​ they submitting to all orders and ordinances of Parlmt. ​
 +
 +" ni. Tiiat all those wch desire to make composition with Parlmt shall have the General'​s effectual recommendation, ​
 +that their fynes shall not exceed ye rate of two year's revenue of their real estate, and proportionable for their personal, ​
 +or yt they may be excepted upon ye conditions express'​d in ye orders of Parlmt, providing for those yt come in by the 
 +first of May last, whether the parties so compounding shall choose, and that after composition so made, such persons ​
 +shall enjoy all liberties and immunities wthout farther tax or assessment, equally and fully wth ye rest of ye inhabitants ​
 +of this kingdom. ​
 +
 +" IV. That all those yt desire to go beyond seas, shall have the General'​s passe for that purpose. ​
 +
 +" V. That no person or persons wtsoever, within ye garrison aforesaid, shall be troubled or molested for wtsoever they 
 +have said or done since the beginning of this Parlmt in prosecution of their commissions,​ in order to ye said garrison. ​
 +
 +" VI. That all and every one of ye persons aforesaid shall, for the space of two months next after ye rendition of ye 
 +said garrison, remain free and unmolested wthin the Parlmts quarters for ye settling and dispatch of their panic affairs, ​
 +they doing nothing prejudicial to ye Parliament. ​
 +
 +" VH. That all sick and wounded persons wtliin the garrison shall have libertie to remaine in some adjacent villages, ​
 +and care be taken for them, untiU they be cured, and then have passes according to ye articles. ​
 +
 +" Vni. That hostages be given on both sides for ye performance of ye said articles. ​
 +
 +T. Fairfax. ​
 +W. Campion." ​
 +
 +Sir Thomas Fairfax to the Speaker of the House of Commons. ​
 +" S'r, On yc siege of Borstal House, weh was surrender'​d by composition,​ amongst other things in yt capitulation,​ it 
 +was agreed that such as desired to make composition wth the Parlmt, should have my effectual recommendation that 
 +their fynes should not exceed ye rate of two yeares of their real estates, and proportionable for their personal estate. ​
 +Sir, my earnest request to ye Honble H, of Comms is, that they please to order it accordingly. I might possibly, wtli 
 +expence of time and blood have freed myself from ye engagement, but I had rather save your friends'​ blood, than win 
 +your enemies'​ money ; and trul^' we could not hope to have forced ye place wthout great hazard, having had experience ​
 +of ye strength thereof, and courage of ye defenders, in a former attempt, wch was forcibly but ineffectually made. Be- 
 +side the country gives ye Governor, Sr W'"​ Campion, the report of a very faire ennemye, and that he had often pro- 
 +tected y'​i>​ from plunder and violence. However, I make it my humble suite, that it may appear that my intercession ​
 +wth you may be as I undertooke effectual, and you will more deeply oblige, ​
 +
 +" Bath, Aug. 3, 1646. Sf, yr most humble servant, T. Fairfax." ​
 +
 +"For ye Honble William Lenthall, Esqre. ​
 +Speaker of ye Hon. House of Commons."​ ' ​
 +
 +The gallant Sir William Campion was killed at the siege of Colchester, and was buried in St. 
 +Peter'​s Church there, with the following inscription on his tomb : 
 +
 +
 +
 +' From original MSS. late in the possession of Sir John Aubrey, Bart, and of William John Campion, Esq. of 
 +Danny, in Sussex. ​
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +Add. Mss. 18982 f.20
 +(To Prince Rupert)
 +Sir,
 +I have certain intelligence that Martyn is put out of Alisbury and a Scotchman is in his place,whose name I cannot yet learne.He is come with Manchesters horse,of which a Troope is quartered at Wadsdon* another at Quainton and two more at Upper Winchington^ the other at Nether Winchington,​the rest I understand lye backward neere Alisbury,​yoy Highness shall heere more from me very suddenly.I humbly desire that those things neccessary for this garrison which were granted mee might not be longer detayned for if this weather hold I shall expect a storme,​which if it happen I hope to give a good accompt,as farr as can be expected from so slender a proportion of ammunition and shall ever remaine,​your most faithfull servant.
 +Wm: Campion
 +Boarstall Jan. 21. 1644/5
 +
 +
 +* Waddesdon
 +^ Upper Winchendon
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +Add.Mss.18982 f.25
 +(To Prince Rupert)
 +Sir,
 +I sent unto you on Wednesday last intelligence that the enemy intended to make a garrison at Chilton,the report hath ever since continued so constant that I went this morning myself with a party of horse to view the situation of the place,and strength of it.There is neer it a smale hill that commands the house,but the church that joyneth to the house commands the hill,in my opinion under 500 men cannot man the place as a garrison,​but if it be only made a horse quarter it will be very prejudiciall to this garrison and so consequently to that of Oxon.
 +My fancy this morning did much envite me to set fyre to the house,but further consideration did make me omitt it,and expect both your highness advice and command which in this poynt as others shall ever be desired and observed by
 +your highness most humble servant.
 +
 +William Campion
 +Boarstall 25.1.1644/​5. ​  
 + 
 +
 +Letters to and concerning Sir William Campion as commander of the Royalist garrison at Boarstall House, co. Bucks.
 +
 +Creation dates: 1644-1646
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +All letters are addressed to Sir William Campion unless otherwise stated.
 +
 +
 +Publication Note
 +A number are printed in G. Lipscomb, History and Antiquities of the County of Bucks., Vol. I, 1847,pp. 76-89; S.A.C., Vol. 10, pp. 4-11, and C. Thomas-Stanford,​ Sussex in the Great Civil War, pp. 134, 191-194. For further correspondence concerning Boarstall House, see Calender of State Papers Domestic, 1644, pp. 216, 320, 325-7, 330, 334, 341, 362-3, 394-5, 1644-5, p. 567, and 1645-7, pp. 99, 147, 431, 2. For an account of the siege, see Lipscomb, Clarendon, History of the Great Rebellion 1706, Vol. 2, pt. 2, pp. 493-94, and J. J. Sheahan, History of Bucks., 1862, pp. 334, 335.
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​35 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From the King, commanding two 'brass Peices'​ to be sent to Oxford.
 +
 +Creation dates: 29 Mar. 1644
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Oxford.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​36 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From William Waller (1597?​-1668;​ see D.N.B.) demanding the surrender of Boarstall House [Written Boston].
 +
 +Creation dates: N.d. [July 1644]
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​37 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From the Commissioners (Edward Littleton (1st Baron, 1589-1645; see D.N.B.), [Francis Baron] Cottington (1578?​-1652;​ see D.N.B.), Hertford (William Seymour, Marquis of Hertford, 1588-1660; see D.N.B.), Dorset (Sir Edward Sackville, 4th Earl, 1591-1652; see D.N.B.), Chichester (Francis, 1st Earl, d. 1653; see D.N.B.), Edward Nicholas (1593-1669; see D.N.B.) and Edward Hyde (1st Earl of Clarendon, 1609-74; see D.N.B.). See Cal. S.P. Dom. Charles I, 1644-45, p. 464.) (acting in the King's absence from Oxford)
 +
 +Creation dates: 18 Oct. 1644
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Oxford
 +Authorising Sir William Campion to commandeer forty horses for the King's service in the villages round Boarstall.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​38 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From the Commissioners,​ (As in DAN/37 together with Henry [1st Earl of] Dover, Sussex (Thomas Savile, 1st Earl, 1590?-1658; see D.N.B.), F [rancis] Seymour (1st Baron, 1590-1664; see D.N.B.), Christopher Hatton (1st Baron, 1605?-70; see D.N.B.) and Jo. Bankes.)
 +
 +Creation dates: 28 Oct. 1644
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Oxford.
 +Authorising him to take command of the garrison at Boarstall.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​39 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From the King
 +
 +Creation dates: 2 Nov. 1644
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Oxford.
 +Commanding draught horses and oxen with harness to be brought to Oxford and delivered to Lord Hopton, General of the Artillery (Ralph, 1st Baron Hopton, 1598-1652; see D.N.B.)
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​40 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From the King
 +
 +Creation dates: 26 Nov. 1644
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Oxford.
 +Authorising Sir William Campion to set up Courts Martial.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​41 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From Prince Rupert (1619-82; see D.N.B.)
 +
 +Creation dates: 1 Dec. 1644
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Granting Sir William Campion his commission as Governor of Boarstall House.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​42 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From the King
 +
 +Creation dates: 14 Dec. 1644
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Oxford.
 +Authorising Sir William Campion to take any measures necessary for the safety of the garrison, including demolishing the church and other buildings and cutting trees to make pallisadoes.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​43 ​
 +Copy of DAN/42.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​44 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From the King
 +
 +Creation dates: 16 Dec. 1644
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Oxford.
 +Commanding Sir William Campion to report to Prince Rupert on his officers, men and supplies.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​45 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From Prince Rupert
 +
 +Creation dates: 22 Dec. 1644
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Oxford.
 +To all officers and soldiers of the King's army, commanding that they exact no plunder or contributions from the hundreds of Ashendon, Buckingham and Cottesloe, co. Bucks
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​46 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From Prince Rupert
 +
 +Creation dates: 27 Jan. 1645
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Oxford.
 +Commanding Sir William Campion to demolish or garrison Chilton House before it can be seized by Parliamentary troops.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​47 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From Prince Rupert
 +
 +Creation dates: 28 Jan. 1645
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Oxford.
 +Countermanding DAN/46 and commanding that the outer walls and doors only of Chilton House be demolished, leaving the body of the house untouched.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​48 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From Prince Rupert
 +
 +Creation dates: 13 Feb. 1645
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Oxford.
 +Authorising Sir William Campion to impress one cart from each neighbouring parish to be employed for 30 days in the fortification of Boarstall House.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​49 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From Edward Nicholas (1593-1669; see D.N.B.)
 +
 +Creation dates: 9 Mar. 1645
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Oxford.
 +Thanking Sir William Campion, on behalf of the King, for the success of his cavalry against the Parliamentary troops, and the return of the plundered teams recovered from the rebels. A note is added in another hand that the Earl of Essex'​s (Robert, 3rd Earl, 1591-1646; see D.N.B.) cavalry are refusing to march until they are paid their arrears.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​50 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From the King
 +
 +Creation dates: 12 Mar. 1645
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Oxford.
 +Commanding Sir William Campion to send supplies of tow, hemp and flax to Sir George Strode (1583-1663; see D.N.B.) and Mr. Wandesford at Oxford for the manufacture of match.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​51 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From the King
 +
 +Creation dates: 13 Mar. 1645
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Oxford.
 +Giving safe passage to livestock and merchandise to Oxford.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​52 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From the King
 +
 +Creation dates: 14 Mar. 1645
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Oxford.
 +Commanding Sir William Campion to obey and furnish all information to the Duke of York (later King James II, 1633-1701; see D.N.B.) and all lords and others of the Privy Council, acting as Commissioners under 'the broade Seale',​ during the King's absence from Oxford.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​53 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From the King
 +
 +Creation dates: 27 Mar. 1645
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Oxford.
 +Commanding Sir William Campion to take measures to gather in corn and grain and render account to the King's Treasurer or one of the principal secretaries.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​54 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From the King
 +
 +Creation dates: 10 Apr. 1645
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Oxford.
 +Commanding Sir William Campion to go into Parliamentary quarters in Bucks., with a strong party of horse, and seize 60 draught horses, which are to be dispatched to Oxford.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​55 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From Sir William Campion to Prince Rupert
 +
 +Creation dates: 15 Apr. 1645
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Boarstall, co. Bucks.
 +Complaining of the plan to make him subordinate to the '​Governor of Oxford'​.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​56 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From the King
 +
 +Creation dates: 20 Apr. 1645
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Oxford.
 +Commanding that the horse and dragoons march to Whately Bridge [Wheatley, co. Oxon.] to receive further orders from the Earl of Northampton (James Compton, 3rd Earl, 1622-1681).
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​57 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From Sir Thomas Fairfax (1612-71; see D.N.B.)
 +
 +Creation dates: 3 June 1645
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Demanding the surrender of the garrison.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​58 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From Sir Thomas Fairfax
 +
 +Creation dates: N.d. [? June 1645]
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Concerning the exchange of prisoners.
 +Subscribed: Copy letter from Sir William Campion to [?Sir Thomas Fairfax] in answer to the summons to surrender.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​59 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From Sir Thomas Fairfax
 +
 +Creation dates: 3 June 1645
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Refusing to permit Lady Campion to leave Boarstall House, but promising her better treatment, if she fall into his hands, than that suffered by Parliamentarian ladies taken by the Royalists at Leicester.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​60 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From the Commissioners (Edward Littleton, Cottington, Hertford, Dorchester (Henry 1st Marquis, 1606-1680; see D.N.B.), Henry Dover, F. Seymour, Christopher Hatton, Edward Nicholas.)
 +
 +Creation dates: 7 July 1645
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Oxford.
 +Requesting a full account of the number of horse and foot, and the supplies, as it is necessary for every garrison to be provisioned for 6 months in case of siege.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​61 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From the Commissioners (Cottington,​ Herttford, Henry Dover, Chichester, F. Seymour, Edward Nicholas.)
 +
 +Creation dates: 26 July 1645
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Oxford.
 +Commanding that the bells of the demolished church at Boarstall be sent to Sir George Strode and Mr. Wandesford at Oxford to make ordnance. The parishioners are to receive compensation when the King's 'great occasions will permit the same'.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​62 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From Harbert Morley
 +
 +Creation dates: 28 July 1645
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Expressing friendship and desiring to meet Lady Campion at Watford or [Great] Berkhamstead,​ co. Herts. Requests Sir William to send him a cipher so that he may send that which he is '​unwilling to delineate'​.
 +Subscribed: [? 4] Aug. 1645. Copy of Sir William Campion'​s reply, in which he states he has no cipher but will allow a trusted friend or servant of Morley safe conduct.
 +
 +
 +
 +Finding Aids
 +(See D.N.B. and R. F. Dell, A Catalogue of the Glynde Place Archives.)
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​63 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From Harbert Morley
 +
 +Creation dates: 4 Aug. 1645
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Expressing friendship and asking that his letter be burnt lest it fall into such hands as may question him for holding correspondence with Sir William.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​64 ​
 +Copy letter from Sir William Campion [to Harbert Morley]
 +
 +Creation dates: [? 4] Aug. 1645
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Affirming his faith in the Protestant religion, the just prerogative of the King and the just privileges of Parliament, and the reasons for his beliefs.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​65 ​
 +Copy letter from Sir William Campion to the King
 +
 +Creation dates: 27 [? Aug. 1645]
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Offering supplies of dragoons and horses from the garrisons.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​66 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From Charles D'​Oilie
 +
 +Creation dates: 13 Sept. 1645
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Requesting the release of Lady Temple'​s gentleman usher.
 +Written at Newport Pagnell, co. Bucks.
 +Subscribed: Two drafts of Sir William'​s reply, refusing to return the man until Sir Peter (1592-1653; see D.N.B.) and Lady Temple have paid the arrears in their contributions to the garrison.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​67 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From the King
 +
 +Creation dates: 1 Oct. 1645
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Bridgnorth, co. Salop.
 +Confirming any commission to Sir William Campion as governor of Boarstall, granted by the King or Prince Rupert, despite the revocation of the latter'​s commission as General of all Forces.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​68 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From the King
 +
 +Creation dates: 1 Oct. 1645
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Newark, co. Notts.
 +Re-appointing Sir William Campion as Governor of Boarstall, and giving him instructions.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​69 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From the King
 +
 +Creation dates: 1 Oct. 1645
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Newark.
 +Commanding Sir William Campion to raise a regiment of five hundred horse.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​70 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From the King
 +
 +Creation dates: 1 Oct. 1645
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Newark.
 +Commanding Sir William Campion to raise a regiment of twelve hundred foot.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​71 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From Francis Martyn
 +
 +Creation dates: 2 Oct. 1645
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Aylesbury, co. Bucks.
 +Complaining of the delay in the exchange of prisoners.
 +Subscribed: Copy of Sir William Campion'​s reply, giving reasons for the delay.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​72 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From the Commissioners (Sir Richard Lane (1584-1650, see D.N.B.) [Francis] Cottington. Hertford (William Seymour), Henry Dover, Chichester (Francis 1st Earl of Chichester),​ F[rancis] Seymour, Edward Nicholas.)
 +
 +Creation dates: 29 Oct. 1645
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Oxford.
 +Requesting the names of persons not assisting the King, and the value of their estates for the purpose of levying fines.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​73 ​
 +LetterFrom the King to James Cromwell
 +
 +Creation dates: 8 Nov. 1645
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Oxford.
 +Appointing him Colonel of the Regiment of Horse lately commanded by Sir Richard Willis, who has resigned.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​74 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From the King
 +
 +Creation dates: 11 Nov. 1645
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Oxford.
 +Commanding Sir William Campion to supply Sir John Cansfeild with arms and ammunition as required. These will be returned to him.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​75 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From the King
 +
 +Creation dates: 19 Nov. 1645
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Oxford.
 +Requesting that £30 a month be contributed towards the expenses of the royal household.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​76 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From the Commissioners (As in DAN/72.)
 +
 +Creation dates: 25 Nov. 1645
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Oxford.
 +Commanding that the contributions of Wolverton, Great Linford, Staunton and Calverton, co. Bucks., hitherto unassigned, be paid to Sir Francis Ruse, the Scoutmaster General of the Army.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​77 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From the King
 +
 +Creation dates: 2 Dec. 1645
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Oxford.
 +Commanding Sir William Campion to give safe conduct and assistance to Captain George Wharton (1617-81; see D.N.B.), who is appointed to raise loans in the counties of Bucks. and Northants.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​78 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From the King
 +
 +Creation dates: 3 Dec. 1645
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Oxford.
 +Commending Sir William Campion for his prompt execution of the King's orders in sending help to Sir John Cansfield and enjoining obedience to the commands of the Commissioners in his absence.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​79 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From the King
 +
 +Creation dates: 5 Dec. 1645
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Oxford.
 +Requesting Sir William Campion to send persons named on an enclosed list to Oxford for the purpose of raising loans.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​80 ​
 +List of persons, arranged according to the hundred, in Bucks, and Oxon.
 +
 +Creation dates: N.d. [1645]
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Subscribed: Copy letter of Sir William Campion [? to the King] complaining that this arbitrary '​fetching in' of countrymen without warning is so incensing the neighbourhood that they threaten to put themselves in a posture of defence.
 +Enclosed in DAN/79
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​81 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From the King
 +
 +Creation dates: 3 Jan. 1646
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Oxford.
 +Commanding Sir William Campion to seize and send to Oxford livestock belonging to Sir Thomas Saunders and Mr. Francis Saunders whose debts have ben transferred to the King by Sir Walter Pye.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​82 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From John Ashburnham
 +
 +Creation dates: 4 Jan. 1646
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Expressing the King's approval of an unspecified matter.
 +
 +
 +
 +Finding Aids
 +(See D.N.B. and F. W. Steer, A Catalogue of the Ashburnham Archives.)
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​83 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From the King
 +
 +Creation dates: 7 Jan. 1646
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Oxford.
 +Assigning to Sir William Campion, for the maintenance of his garrison, the contributions of the towns of Newport Hundred that are not already assigned to Sir John Heydon (d. 1653; see D.N.B.).
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​84 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From the King
 +
 +Creation dates: 10 Feb. 1646
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Oxford.
 +Commanding thirty mounted musketeers to be provided ready to march under four officers by 24 Feb.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​85 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From Thomas Bulstrode
 +
 +Creation dates: 12 Mar. 1646
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Aylesbury, co. Bucks.
 +Concerning the treatment of deserters from the garrison at Boarstall.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​86 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From Thomas Bulstrode
 +
 +Creation dates: 12 Mar. 1646
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Aylesbury.
 +Concerning the treatment of prisoners and men breaking parole, and assuring Sir William Campion of his wife's protection, and requesting in return protection for the wife of the high sheriff of Bucks., Mr. Beke, at Haddenham, co. Bucks.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​87 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From Thomas Bulstrode
 +
 +Creation dates: 4 Apr. 1646
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Aylesbury
 +Enclosing the protection [missing] granted by Sir William Campion to the high sheriff'​s wife, and requesting the return of Lady Campion'​s protection and allowing her two days to return to the garrison.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​88 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From Thomas Bulstrode
 +
 +Creation dates: 5 Apr. 1646
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Aylesbury
 +Requesting again the return of the protection granted to Lady Campion, together with the protection granted to the wife of Captain Paris.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​89 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From the King
 +
 +Creation dates: 7 Apr. 1646
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Oxford.
 +Approving Sir William Campion'​s services and rejecting recent frivolous charges made against him.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​90 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From Edward Nicholas (1593-1669; see D.N.B.)
 +
 +Creation dates: 11 Apr. 1646
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Oxford.
 +Acknowledging a letter to the King, and requesting any news of the enemy'​s movements or of events in London. Gives news of Montrose'​s (James Graham, 1st Marquis and 5th Earl of Montrose, 1612-50; see D.N.B.) army.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​91 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From the King
 +
 +Creation dates: 13 Apr. 1646
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Oxford.
 +Requesting Sir William Campion to collect the contributions due from Newport Hundred, co. Bucks., because Sir John Heyden, to whom they were assigned, cannot go there as the way is obstructed.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​92 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From Thomas Shilborne
 +
 +Creation dates: 14 Apr. 1646
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Brill, co. Bucks.
 +Saying that he has sent to London for the sack Sir William Campion requested, as there is none good enough for 'soe gallant an enemye'​ in Brill, and suggesting a meeting.
 +Subscribed: Copy of Sir William Campion'​s reply, explaining that he cannot at present go to Brill, but inviting Thomas Shilborne to visit him at Boarstall.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​93 ​
 +Letter From John Browne to Edward Campion
 +
 +Creation dates: 5 May 1646
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Woodstock, co. Oxon.
 +Urging him to persuade Sir William Campion to a speedy surrender as Banbury and the King himself are in their (i.e. Parliament'​s) hands, and promising to try and obtain favourable terms for him.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​94 ​
 +Copy letter from Sir William Campion to [? Sir Thomas Fairfax]
 +
 +Creation dates: N.d. [ ? May 1646]
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Concerning the surrender of the garrison in the event of the King's final defeat.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​95 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From Sir Thomas Fairfax
 +
 +Creation dates: 12 May 1646
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Summoning Sir William Campion to surrender Boarstall House and offering honourable terms.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​96 ​
 +Copy of Sir William Campion'​s reply to Sir Thomas Fairfax
 +
 +Creation dates: 12 May 1646
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Requesting time to receive instructions from the King or the Commissioners at Oxford.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​97 ​
 +Copy letter from Sir William Campion to the King
 +
 +Creation dates: 26 May [1646]
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Requesting the King's will with regard to the demand for surrender, and recommending the bearer, Captain Dykes, to his notice.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​98 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From Thomas Shilborne
 +
 +Creation dates: 31 May 1646
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Before Boarstall House.
 +Urging him to surrender while terms are still favourable, as there is no chance of relief, Oxford being on the point of surrender, the Scots and Parliament being in agreement, and Montrose'​s army disbanded.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​99 ​
 +Copy of Sir William Campion'​s reply to DAN/98
 +
 +Creation dates: N.d. [1646]
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Requesting permission to have an enclosed letter sent to Sir Thomas Glenham at Oxford, to obtain information of his instructions concerning surrender.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​100 ​
 +Copy [witnessed by George Kingsley and Edward Campion] of letter from Sir Thomas Fairfax to [ ? Thomas Shilborne]
 +
 +Creation dates: 1 June 1646
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Headington, co. Oxon.
 +Explaining why he cannot permit Sir William Campion to send a letter to Sir Thomas Glenham, and enclosing a letter from the latter to Sir William which shows Glenham'​s attitude.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​101 ​
 +Copy [witnessed by George Kingsley and Edward Campion] of letter from Sir Thomas Glenham to [Sir Thomas Fairfax]
 +
 +Creation dates: Enclosed in DAN/100: 1 June 1646
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Oxford.
 +Concerning the terms for the surrender of Oxford.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​102 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From Thomas Shilborne
 +
 +Creation dates: 2 June 1646
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Before Boarstall House.
 +Expressing hope that Sir Thomas Glenham'​s letter has convinced Sir William Campion that surrender is advisable, and asking him to meet him to arrange terms.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​103 ​
 +Resolution of the Governor and Council of War
 +
 +Creation dates: 2 June 1646
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Boarstall.
 +And the rest of the garrison at Boarstall House that a treaty for the surrender of the garrison be made with general consent. Signed by thirty members.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​104 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From Sir Thomas Fairfax
 +
 +Creation dates: 3 June 1646
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Water Eaton, co. Bucks.
 +Informing Sir William Campion of the names of the commissioners appointed by him to meet with those of Sir William concerning the surrender.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​105 ​
 +Resolution signed by twenty-seven officers of Boarstall House approving that a treaty be soon made by the governor for the surrender of the garrison on honourable conditions.
 +
 +Creation dates: 6 June 1646
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​106 ​
 +Articles of Agreement for the surrender of Boarstall House. Signed by Sir Thomas Fairfax.
 +
 +Creation dates: 6 June 1646
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​107 ​
 +Copy of DAN/106.
 +
 +Creation dates: 6 June 1646
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​108 ​
 +Copy letter from Sir William Campion to Prince Rupert
 +
 +Creation dates: 6 June 1646
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Bidding him farewell on his departure from the country, and explaining certain clauses of the articles of surrender.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​109 ​
 +Before Oxford. Safe conduct granted by Sir Thomas Fairfax to Sir William Campion and his men, to go into Kent after the surrender of Boarstall House.
 +
 +Creation dates: 20 June 1646
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​110 ​
 +Letter From Sir Thomas Fairfax to William Lenthall, Speaker of the House of Commons (1591-1662; see D.N.B.)
 +
 +Creation dates: 3 Aug. 1646
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Written at Bath, co. Somerset.
 +Requesting that the Commons comply with the clause in the articles of surrender, which provides that the fines of those who desire to make composition should not exceed two years' revenue of their real estate and proportionable for their personal estate.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​111 ​
 +Copy of DAN/110.
 +
 +Creation dates: 3 Aug. 1646
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​112 ​
 +Letter to Sir William Campion From Sir Thomas Fairfax to all officers and soldiers under his command
 +
 +Creation dates: 3 Aug. 1646
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Stating that Sir William Campion and his officers have been granted six weeks' extension to make their composition with Parliament and ordering that they be not molested.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​113 ​
 +Safe conduct granted by Sir Thomas Fairfax to Sir William Campion and his household to transport themselves beyond the seas.
 +
 +Creation dates: 3 Aug. 1646
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​114 ​
 +Copy of DAN/113 in the hand of Sir William Campion, and witnessed by Thomas Parker and George Parker.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​115 ​
 +Annexed to DAN/114: Warrant from William Lenthall, to all customs searchers and officers, to permit Sir William Campion to embark at Rye or Dover.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/116, 117 
 +Receipts of Richard Waring and Michael Herring for two sums of £677 from William Campion being his fine for delinquency.
 +
 +Creation dates: 26 Oct. 1646
 +
 +Extent and Form: 2 docs 
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​118 ​
 +Letter from Elizabeth Campion to Mrs. Horsmonden
 +
 +Creation dates: N.d
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Concerning letters sent to the latter'​s husband by Sir Thomas Collipepyr [Culpepper] (1578-1662; see D.N.B.).
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​119 ​
 +Letter from George Goring, Earl of Norwich at Colchester to Lady Campion
 +
 +Creation dates: 26 June 1648
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Offering condolences on the death of her son, Sir William Campion.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​120-128 ​
 +Copies of 32 of the above letters and copy of the inscription on the tomb of Sir William Campion at Colchester.
 +
 +Creation dates: N.d. [18th cent.]
 +
 +Extent and Form: 9 docs 
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​129-132 ​
 +Correspondence from George Lipscomb to W. J. Campion
 +
 +Creation dates: May-July 1830
 +
 +Extent and Form: 4 docs 
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +Concerning the use of the Campion papers relating to the siege of Boarstall for the publication of The History and Antiquities of the County of Buckingham.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​133-138 ​
 +Copies of 11 of the above Civil War letters, made by George Lipscomb
 +
 +Creation dates: N.d. [c. 1847]
 +
 +Extent and Form: 6 docs 
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +From copies in the possession of the 5th Earl of Tankerville,​ James Scott and John Eagleton, esqs., executors of John Aubrey, bt.,late of Dorton House, co. Bucks. and list of those not copied.
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​139 ​
 +Prospectus of The History and Antiquities of the County of Buckingham by G. Lipscomb. esq., M.D., and list of subscribers.
 +
 +Creation dates: N.d. [c. 1847]
 +
 +
 +
 +Other Civil War Papers
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/​140 ​
 +Account of money expended by Peter Courthope for the service of the state
 +
 +Creation dates: 1642-1645
 +
 +  
 +  ​
 +SETTLEMENTS:​ GORING FAMILY
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +Reference: DAN/141, 142 
 +Copy Marriage Settlement
 +
 +Creation dates: 16 July 1630
 +
 +
 +Scope and Content ​
 +2 copies, one dated 1649 between (a) George [1st] Lord Goring, Baron of Hurstpierpoint and George Goring, esq., his s. and heir; (b) Richard (Boyle 1st Earl of Corke and 1st Viscount Dungarven, 1566-1643;​see D.N.B.), Robert Lord Digby [1st] Baron of Geashill in Ireland and Sir Thomas Stafford of London, kt. (fl. 1633; see D.N.B.).
 +Manor of Hurstpierpoint,​ Danny Park, Herst Park, capital messuage called Danny House, advowson of the church of Hurstpierpoint,​ and lands in Hurstpierpoint,​ Bolney, Lewes and Cuckfield; capital messuage in the borough of Lewes, and other messuages in Lewes; manor of Hownedeane als. Hongedeene and tenements, buildings, lands, pastures, sheep leazes and sheep courses called Smithwyke. Howneden als. Hongden, Lamport, Winterborne,​ the Puetts, the Wallonds, Byttleworth als. Ballesden and Frackborough,​ and one croft of land enclosed called Leedes Croft lying like a square adjoining the arable lands of Iford on the N. part, to a parcel of land called the Compe of Northease on the E. part and the droveway of Northease on the S. part (4a.) and certain parcels of arable land in the fields of Northease abutting a tenement called Croppiers and certain other lands in different places in the East lane and arable lands of Northease, and others in the North lane, all containing 30a.; one parcel of land called Leads Down, sheep leases and sheep courses abutting to the S. corner of the South lane and the arable lands of Northease and lying by a bank to a '​hountote'​ where sometime stood a cross, and abutting to the Downs and sheep courses of the Manor of Rodmell to the S., and to the Waine waies on the W., and to a stone called Aldermans Stone, and abutting to the down and sheep courses of the Manor of Northease on the N., and abutting to the S. lane and arable lands of the Manor of Northease on the N., and abutting to the S. lane and arable lands of the Manor of Northease on the E. (100a) in occ. of Francis Ersey, all which croft and lands are called Leedes lands; lands in Rodmell which George Lord Goring purchased of Christopher Saxpes, gent.
 +4 messuages, 4 cottages and a toft called Green Garth, 6 oxgangs of land and certain '​forby'​ lands in Burshill and Brandesburton,​ co. Yorks, once in the tenure of Richard Dalby, Christopher Burton, Thomas Starneman, Susan Gibson, Ralph Jackson and Richard Bowter and after of Thomas Lamplough, gent, and now of George Lord Goring; 1 other oxgang of land in Brandesburton,​ co. Yorks, late in tenure of Thomas Lamplough, and one cottage in Burshill between the common way called the lane on the S. side and the lands once Lady Dakers on the N., 1 parcel of meadow containing 1 '​sweyth'​ in the Inge Carr within the liberties or precinct of Burshill in Longdale, parcel of meadow containing 1 '​sweyth'​ in the Inge Carr in Bulldale called Seggan Sweyth.
 +Recites lease for year dated 13 July 1630 by (a) to (b).
 +Now in consideration of the prospective marriage of George Goring. esq., and Letice, 3rd d. of Richard Earl of Corke, and in consideration of £10.000 as marriage portion, (a) has released and confirmed the premises to (b) to the use of George Goring, the s. for life, remainder to Lady Letice for life as jointure, remainder to Richard, Earl of Corke, Robert Lord Digby and Sir Thomas Stafford for 21 years in trust to raise such portions as George, Lord Goring shall appoint in his will for the children of the marriage, remainder to the male heirs of the marriage, remainder to (b) for 80 years in trust to raise certain specified portions for the daughters of the marriage, remainder to the male heirs, remainder to Charles Goring, 2nd s. of George Lord Goring and his male heirs, remainder to the right heirs of George Goring.
 +Witnesses: Charles Hooker, Thomas Badnedge, Thomas Hinson, Gerrard Booth.
 +
 +  
 +Letter from Sir T. Fairfax, that Borstall Castle had surrendered;​ and that he was treating about Oxford.
 +"For the Right Honourable the Earl of Manchester, Speaker of the House of Peers.
 +"My Lord,
 +"​Having lately entered into a Treaty concerning the Surrender of Borstall House, it hath pleafed God (at last) to bring them within the Garrison (though at first very obstinate) to condescend to a Surrender thereof according to these inclosed Articles, which I humbly present to the House. On Thursday last we entered to treat with Oxford, wherein we have made some Progress; and thereof, as any Thing material offers itself, you shall receive a further Account from,
 +Marston, June 7, 1646.
 +"My Lord,
 +"Your most humble Servant,
 +"T. Fairfax."​
 +"​Articles of Agreement, made the 6th of June, 1646, between Quarter-master General Gravenor, Major Harrison, Major Huntington, and Major Shilborne, on Behalf of his Excellency Sir Thomas Fairefax on the one Part; and Sir George Aglionbye Knight, Captain George Kingsley, Captain Duke Wyvell, and Edward Campion Esquire, in Behalf of Sir William Campion Knight, Governor of Borstall, on the other Part; as followeth:
 +Articles for the Surrender of Borstall Castle.
 +"1. That the Garrison of Borstall, with all the Ordnance, Arms, Ammunition, and all other Provisions and Furniture of War whatsoever, belonging to the said Garrison (except what is allowed in the ensuing Articles), be delivered unto his Excellency Sir Thomas Fairefax, or whom he shall appoint to receive them, for the Use of the Parliament, upon the 10th Day of June next ensuing; and that, upon the Signing of these Articles, there be delivered to the Commissioners on his Excellency'​s Part a just Bill of all the Store then remaining in the said Garrison, and the same to be preserved without Spoil or Embezzlement,​ and delivered up as aforesaid.
 +"2. That the Governor, with his proper Servants, and all Officers in Commission, and Gentlemen within the said Garrison, shall march away, with their Horses, Arms, and (Footnote *) properly belonging to them; and that all Common Soldiers, and all other Persons, none excepted, within the said Garrison, shall march away with their own proper Goods to their own Houses (if they shall desire it); and shall have the General'​s Pass and Protection, quietly to remain at their Habitations;​ they submitting to all Orders and Ordinances of Parliament.
 +"3. That all those that desire to make Composition with the Parliament shall have the General'​s effectual Recommendation,​ That their Fines shall not exceed the Rate of Two Years Revenue of their Real Estates, and proportionable for their Personal; or that they may be accepted upon the Condition expressed in the Order of Parliament providing for those that (Footnote †) came in by the First of May last (whether the Parties for compounding shall choose); and that, after Composition so made, such Persons shall enjoy all Liberties and Immunities, without farther Tax or Assessment, equally and fully with the rest of the Inhabitants of this Kingdom.
 +"4. That all those that desire to go over beyond Seas shall have the General'​s Pass for that Purpose.
 +"5. That no Person or Persons, within the Garrison aforesaid, shall be troubled or molested for whatsoever they have said or done since the Beginning of the Parliament, in Prosecution of their Commissions,​ in order to the said Garrison.
 +"6. That all and every of the Persons aforesaid shall, for the Space of Two Months next after the Rendition of the said Garrison, (Footnote ‡) remain free and unmolested within the Parliament'​s Quarters, for the Settling and Dispatch of their particular Affairs, they doing nothing prejudicial to the Parliament.
 +"7. That all sick and wounded Persons in the Garrison shall have Liberty to remain in some adjacent Village; and Care to be taken for them until they be cured, and then to have Passes according to the Articles.
 +"8. That Hostages be given on both Sides, for the due Performance of these Articles.
 +"Geo. Aglionby,
 +George Kingsley,
 +"Duke Wyvell,
 +Edward Campion."​
 +"​Ormond'​s Letter to Major General Monro.From: 'House of Lords Journal Volume 8: 8 June 1646', Journal of the House of Lords: volume 8: 1645-1647 (1802), pp. 363-66. URL: http://​www.british-history.ac.uk/​report.asp?​compid=34047&​strquery=captain. Date accessed: 20 July 2005.
 =====Strength===== =====Strength=====
   *March 1644: 6 troops at Cheriton?   *March 1644: 6 troops at Cheriton?