Sir William Dalston’s Regiment of Foot

Active1648
CountryEngland
AllegianceRoyalist
ConflictsSecond Civil War
TypeFoot
ColonelSir William Dalston
George Denton
Area RaisedCumberland
Coat Colour
Flag Colour
Flag Design
Field ArmiesLangdale 1648

Later Colonel George Denton’s Regiment of Foot

Royalist regiment of foot raised in 1643. fighting in the Preston campaign of the Second Civil War

Service History

1643

  • Raised in Cumberland
  • August: Battle of Preston
  • October: Surrender at Appleby

Notes

Coats, Flags and Equipment

Notable Officers

A list of the regiment's officers is shown in Officers and Regiments of the Royalist Army by Stuart Reid (Partizan Press).

Sir William Dalston

Sir William Dalston was wounded in the Preston campaign of 1648 but survived.

George Denton

Took over from Dalston, previously Lieutenant Colonel.

Sir William Dalstons Regiment of Foot

Colonel Sir William Dalston

Lieutenant Colonel George Denton (1) + ment. I.O.

Sargeant Major

Captain Ellis (1) Captain Henry Gentles Captain Laurence Walker Ment. I.O.

Lieutenant Thomas Addinson I.O. Cumberland to Capt. Walker Lieutenant Alexander Hodgson I.O. Cumberland Lieutenant George Lowther I.O. Cumberland to Lt.Col. Denton Lieutenant Thomas Wilson I.O. Cumberland to Capt. Gent.

Quartermaster Robert Blaymyre I.O. Cumberland

Ensign John Eglesfield I.O. Cumberland Ensign William Hindmer I.O. Westmoreland

(1) Cumbria Record Office D.MUS 5/5/4/12

The information of Lieutenant Colonel George Denton against Sir Thomas Dacre Knt. and Colonel.

Sheweth

1. That when the said Lt. Col. was commanded by Sir Philipp Musgrave to march into Gilsland to levy seising for his Majesties service he was informed by Thomas Milborne high Constable that the said Thomas was appointed by Sir Thomas Dacre to raise the Country to stopp the said Lt. Colonel and his Majesties forces then under his Command at Carlettonmoore.

2. That the Constables at Brampton at first denied him quarters,saying those quarters are taken up for Sir Thomas Dacre.

3. That whilst he was levying the seise for Brampton towne and the places adioyning,a great party of the Country people came armed to Boothby about a mile an a halfe distant from Brampton saying their Colonel commanded them soe to doe.

4. That the said Sir Thomas upon Satturday the xxixth of September last did say that George Denton and others came into Gilsland to (not sure of word) sessing without authoritie.

5. That when Captaine Ellis had told him that Lt. Col. Denton had a Commission from Sir Philipp Musgrave then Commander in Chiefe,Sir Thomas Dacre answered that neither he nor any Musgrave in England had power to give him authority,and that he knewe there was noe order for it.

6. That the said Sir Thomas said,was there none but George Denton and Ellis to be sent about that service and used many other disparageing words against the said Lt. Col. vist that he came hither to tyranize over the Kings loyal subjects,that he had made up his pocketts there and that the said Lt. Col. Denton and those that were with him must not thinke to goe away with it soe,for they would be even with them for it.

7. That the said Sir Thomas (not sure of word) his malice against Sir Phillip Musgrave and the said Lt. Col,by often repeating the words in the foure last Articles and other words to the like sense.

George Denton

SP29.14.40 September 1660 ? Extract To the Kings most excellent Majestie The humble petition of Sir William Dalston Knight and Baronet. Sheweth That in the beginning of the late warres the petitioner being then a member of that Parliament service of your Majesties royall fathe of blessed memory wherein he was at great charge in the raysing of horse and foot which he commanded as Collonell under the right honorable the Marquesse of Newcastle and was one of the besieged dureinge the siege of Carlisle wherein he endured great extremity and haveing to the last remained faithfull to your Majestie was in respect thereof put to great loss by Sequestration and decimation of his estate besides a fine of 4000li.

Strength

See Also