Disbanding the New Irish Army May 1641

The troops when disbanded are to be put under the command of several captains, for services in foreign parts1). The allotment is to be as follows:—

  • Colonel Butler 1,000 men.
  • Sir Lorenzo Carey 1,000 „
  • Lieut.-Col. Tibbatah 1,000 „
  • Lieut.-Col. Barry 1,000 „ (Garret Barry)
  • Sir James Dillon 1,000 „
  • Sir …. Beling 1,000 „
  • Lieut.-Col Winter 1,000 „
  • Capt. John Barry 1,000 „

The King will give licence for the departure of these men, so that Ireland will be quite relieved of them.

Notes

Strafford's New Irish Army, intended to serve against the Scots in the Second Bishops' War, instead remained in Ireland. By May 1641 plans were made for disbanding the force. As the rank and file were mostly Catholic they were to be sent abroad as mercenaries. Several officers were allowed to recruit the men, as above, to which were added Col. Richard Plunkett and Col. Hugh Mac Phelim O'Byrne in July 1641, Colonel John Bermingham2) and Viscount Taafe3). In September 1641 Parliament blocked plans to send them to the Continent, fearing they would be used to attack England or Protestant allies. After the Irish uprising of November 1641 most of these officers, and likely their men, joined the Catholic Confederation armies4).

1) CSPI 1633-47 p281
2) CSPI 1633-47 p339
3) Confederate Catholics at War. Padraig Lenihan, Cork University Press, 2001. ISBN 1 85918 244 5. p 45
4) Confederate Catholics at War. Padraig Lenihan, Cork University Press, 2001. ISBN 1 85918 244 5. p 18