Sir Charles Coote’s Regiment of Horse

Active164(5?) to 1655
CountryIreland
AllegianceParliamentarian
ConflictsIrish Confederate War
TypeHorse
ColonelSir Charles Coote
Area RaisedIreland
Flag Colour
Flag Design
Field ArmiesCoote 1649-51

Regiment of Horse raised and fighting in Ireland and eventually maintained by the Commonwealth

Service History

1642

  • Coote commands 12 horsemen as Provost of Connaught

1645

  • May: Coote returns to Ireland, having been appointed President of Connaught by Parliament
  • July: Taking of Sligo?

1646

1647

1648

1649

  • March to August: Besieged at Derry by the Laggan Army
  • September: Storm of Coleraine?
  • November: Take Carrickfergus?
  • December: Take Carrickfergus?

1650

  • January: Takes surrender of Monro at Enniskillen
  • June: Battle of Lifford?
  • June: Battle of Scarrifhollis
  • August: Repulsed from Charlemont?

1651

  • June: Take Athlone?
  • June: Take Portumna?
  • August to May 1652: Siege of Galway

1652

1653

1654

1655

  • August: Disbanded, but Coote retains command of one troop

Notes

A history of the regiment is given in The Regimental History of Cromwell's Army by Sir Charles Firth and Godfrey Davies, Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1940.

Sir Charles Coote, Second Baronet, fought against the Irish Confederates from the beginning of the Irish Uprising in 1641. His father the first Baronet, confusingly also named Sir Charles Coote, campaigned as part of Ormond’s forces until killed at Trim in 1642. Sir Charles Coote junior was driven from Connaught in 1643 and travelled to England hoping to gain support. Receiving no help from the King, he declared for Parliament and in 1645 was appointed President of Connaught.

Exactly when he raised his regiment of horse is currently unclear. In 1649 Coote, acting on behalf of Parliament, was besieged at Derry by his previous allies of the Laggan Army. Enduring the siege, he went on to co-operate with Cromwell and Venables. In 1650 he accepted the surrender of the remains of Monro’s Scots expeditionary force in Ulster. The regiment fought at the Battle of Scarrifhollis that year and at the siege of Galway the next year. In 1655 his regiment, having been supported and paid by Parliament, was disbanded. Coote retained command of one troop and was politically active during the Restoration crisis.

Flags and Equipment

Notable Officers

Sir Charles Coote, Second Baronet

Officer Lists

Winter 1647-81)

  • Colonel Sir Charles Coote
    • Captain-lieutenant John Ormesbey
  • Major Robert Ormsbey
  • Captain Sir George St George
  • Captain Sir Francis Hamilton
  • Colonel Robert Sanderson
  • Captain Michael Belfore

Strength

  • January 1646: A single troop

See Also

1) N.A. SP28/202/288