Lord Lindsay’s Regiment of Foot

Active1639
1640 to 1641
1642 to 1646
CountryScotland
AllegianceCovenanter
ConflictsFirst Bishops’ War
Second Bishops’ War
Irish Confederate War
TypeFoot
ColonelLord Lindsay
John Hamilton
Area RaisedFife
Aberdeen
Coat Colour
Flag Colour
Flag Design
Field ArmiesLeslie 1639
Leslie 1640
Leslie 1642
Monro 1643-6

Later Colonel John Hamilton's Regiment of Foot

Scots Covenanter regiment of foot serving in the Bishops’ Wars, then in Ireland

Service History

1639

  • Two regiments raised from Fife with command shared between Lindsay, Sinclair and Rothes
  • June: Join Leslie’s army at Duns Law
  • June: Holding of Kelso?
  • June: Standoff at Duns Law
  • June: Disbanded following the Treaty of Birks

1640

  • Re-raised in Fife
  • Join Leslie's army at Duns
  • August: Battle of Newburn Ford
  • August to August 1641: Occupy Newcastle

1641

  • August: Return to Scotland and disbanded after the Treaty of London

1642

  • March: Lindsay commissioned Colonel and the regiment raised anew
  • Shipped to Ulster
  • May: Quartered at Broadisland and Islandmagee

1643

  • April: Raid on Clandeboy's Wood
  • Campaigning with Monro
  • May: Skirmish at Tanderagee
  • May: Skirmish at Loughgall

1644

  • Serving in Ulster
  • May: Hamilton promoted to Colonel
  • June to September: 6 companies on campaign with Monro
  • July: Repulsed from Newry?
  • October: Return to quarters

1645

  • Spring: 200 men detached to Home of Heugh's composite unit for service in Scotland

1646

  • June: Battle of Benburb

1647

1648

  • At least 200 men detached to George Monro’s Engager force for service in England

Notes

A history of the unit is shown in Edward M. Furgol’s A Regimental History of the Covenanting Armies 1639-1651 Edinburgh, 1990. ISBN 0 85976 194 0

In 1640 the regiment was particularly distinguished for their part in the Covenanter victory at the Battle of Newburn Ford. Raised anew in 1642 for service in Ireland, they remained in the Ulster army until 1648, after which no more is recorded.

Coats, Flags and Equipment

Notable Officers

Lord Lindsay

John, 10th Lord Lindsay, he later assumed the title Earl of Crawford-Lindsay. Lindsay did not serve in Ireland, the regiment being led by Hamilton.

John Hamilton

Lieutenant Colonel of the regiment from 1642 to 1644, then promoted to Colonel.

Strength

  • June 1642: 1014 officers & men in 10 companies
  • Autumn 1642: 1030 officers & men with 102 sick

See Also